Laws of Form

A brief introduction to the mathematics of consciousness


We know what change is, and stillness. We've been to those two different places. Let's call that difference the distinction we want to work with for now.

We see how we could make a mark to represent change. We decide to use parentheses to do that. We take some room and mark some parentheses and look at that

( )

We see how an empty space, an unmarked space, could represent stillness. A lack of parentheses. We take some room for some unmarked space, and look at that

 

 

And we know a couple of different ways to stack up change. We see how moving from stillness to change is a change in itself. And moving back to stillness is another change. So we know the way that two changes take us back to where we started - two changes mean no change, just stillness. We can use parentheses like this to remind us of that way of thinking of change

(( )) =

And we know another way of thinking of change - change after change is just more change. And we can use parentheses this way to remind us of that

( )( ) = ( )

And, after awhile, we can see how the first-order arithmetic of the laws of form can take complex expressions and simplify them with the two rules above. We can get used to manipulations like this

((( )( ))) = ((( ))) = ( )

And we can see that in some cases, we can write expressions where we use variables that might represent any arrangement of these tokens, and we can derive some general rules, such as

((x)) = x

and

(x)y = (xy)y

and so on...

Let's suppose we are good at moving from stillness to change, and back again. We decide to keep doing this until we are used to it, until it becomes a way of life we are familiar with.

Then, after a change, one way or the other, we ask ourselves: 'are we somewhere new?' and we answer, no. We know this vibration, and moving from one side to another doesn't change us. To remind ourselves, we write

X = (X)

After a change, we are still the same, if we become used to vibration.


A contribution by Jim Snyder Grant in the LOF discussion forum.
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